SCARR Blog

Reuniting Families Separated by Adoption

N.J. may be the 9th state to allow access to the original birth certificate

June14

http://www.northjersey.com/news/state/96236784_N_J__may_be_9th_state_to_allow_open_adoptions.html

NJ Adoption Group, did not accept the proposal from Govenor Christy.  They are still trying to get the law changed to obtain access to the OBC.

N.J. may be 9th state to allow open adoptions
Sunday, June 13, 2010
Last updated: Sunday June 13, 2010, 10:06 AM

BY SUSAN K. LIVIO
State House Bureau
STATE HOUSE BUREAU

Every two years for the past three decades, a relentless group of people has told lawmakers their most personal stories in a plea for the most personal of details: They were adopted and they desperately want to know who more about their background.

Every time, their emotional efforts have failed to overcome lawmakers’ contention that their birth mothers expected privacy. Then the legislation that would have allowed them to obtain their original birth certificates dies.

Supporters are hoping their losing streak ends Monday when the Assembly Human Services Committee convenes to debate and presumably approve the bill.

Unlike her predecessors over the last decade, Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver, D-Essex, said she supports the legislation and will allow the 80-member body to vote on it.

The bill already passed the Senate in March. Next stop if it clears the Assembly: Governor Christie’s desk. His spokesman said the administration will review the legislation if the Assembly passes it.

If Christie signs the bill, New Jersey would be the ninth state to allow adopted adults, or children represented by their adoptive parents, to obtain their original birth certificates.

“I wholeheartedly support it. Adoptees and advocates are entitled to have their interests addressed by the Legislature,’’ Oliver said last week.

Committee Chairwoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle, D-Bergen, said she thinks the time is right as acceptance grows for open adoptions. She’s also examined documents private adoption agencies required birth mothers to sign in the 1960s saying the conditions of the surrender end at “the term of the child’s minority.” Seeing that language “was the turning point for me,’’ Huttle said.

“It’s been too long. Thirty years later, it’s a different society,’’ she said.

But opponents argue the bill is different from its predecessors because it outs future biological moms who choose adoption over abortion.

“For prospective adoptions, the bill takes away the option of privacy,’’ New Jersey Right to Life executive director Marie Tasy said. “The language of the bill says the birth parent can fill out a preference form, but it’s just that — a preference, not an absolute veto.’’

“That section of the bill has caused a lot of confusion among legislators,’’ Tasy added.

Upon the adopted person’s request, the state Bureau of Vital Statistics and Registration would produce both the birth certificate and the contact preference form, leaving it up to the adopted person to decide whether to honor a request for no contact, according to the bill.

Biological mothers who have surrendered children up to now would continue to have far more protections. If they want their name and address removed, they have 12 months after the law is finalized to submit a notarized letter requesting no contact.

In three states that enacted a law similar to the one pending in New Jersey, requests for birth records far outweigh the number of biological parents requesting no contact.

Susan K. Livio is a reporter for the Star-Ledger. E-mail: slivio@starledger.com

Every two years for the past three decades, a relentless group of people has told lawmakers their most personal stories in a plea for the most personal of details: They were adopted and they desperately want to know who more about their background.

Every time, their emotional efforts have failed to overcome lawmakers’ contention that their birth mothers expected privacy. Then the legislation that would have allowed them to obtain their original birth certificates dies.

Supporters are hoping their losing streak ends Monday when the Assembly Human Services Committee convenes to debate and presumably approve the bill.

Unlike her predecessors over the last decade, Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver, D-Essex, said she supports the legislation and will allow the 80-member body to vote on it.

The bill already passed the Senate in March. Next stop if it clears the Assembly: Governor Christie’s desk. His spokesman said the administration will review the legislation if the Assembly passes it.

If Christie signs the bill, New Jersey would be the ninth state to allow adopted adults, or children represented by their adoptive parents, to obtain their original birth certificates.

“I wholeheartedly support it. Adoptees and advocates are entitled to have their interests addressed by the Legislature,’’ Oliver said last week.

Committee Chairwoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle, D-Bergen, said she thinks the time is right as acceptance grows for open adoptions. She’s also examined documents private adoption agencies required birth mothers to sign in the 1960s saying the conditions of the surrender end at “the term of the child’s minority.” Seeing that language “was the turning point for me,’’ Huttle said.

“It’s been too long. Thirty years later, it’s a different society,’’ she said.

But opponents argue the bill is different from its predecessors because it outs future biological moms who choose adoption over abortion.

“For prospective adoptions, the bill takes away the option of privacy,’’ New Jersey Right to Life executive director Marie Tasy said. “The language of the bill says the birth parent can fill out a preference form, but it’s just that — a preference, not an absolute veto.’’

“That section of the bill has caused a lot of confusion among legislators,’’ Tasy added.

Upon the adopted person’s request, the state Bureau of Vital Statistics and Registration would produce both the birth certificate and the contact preference form, leaving it up to the adopted person to decide whether to honor a request for no contact, according to the bill.

Biological mothers who have surrendered children up to now would continue to have far more protections. If they want their name and address removed, they have 12 months after the law is finalized to submit a notarized letter requesting no contact.

In three states that enacted a law similar to the one pending in New Jersey, requests for birth records far outweigh the number of biological parents requesting no contact.

Susan K. Livio is a reporter for the Star-Ledger. E-mail: slivio@starledger.com

Rhode Island Adult Adoptee Access – Pending Legislation

May31

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7112DLgEuOg

H7877 passed in the Rhode Island House unanimously   63-0 and now goes to the Senate.

Rhode Island Senate Bill # 2799

Illlinois – Adoption Law Change for Adoptees

May24

Nov/2012 – All adoptees can obtain their OBC along with the CI program does not require a fee as of Jan 1st, 2013

 

Quinn Signs Adoption Records Law    – May 21, 2010

 While Mayor Daley has been on a crusade to bring security and safety to Chicago, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has been keeping busy by taking a different path: the Governor on Friday finally signed into law a bill which allows adults who were adopted as children to have easier access to their birth certificates. The main aspects of the new law is, as outlined by the Sun-Times:
  • People seeking birth certificates of adoptions that took place before 1946 can access their information immediately.
  • For those seeking birth certificates after 1946, state officials will spend the next 1.5 years “notifying birth parents and adoptive children that they need to contact the state and declare whether or not they wish to be found … After Nov. 15, 2011, people involved in adoption can request birth certificates, and if the other parties involved have filed no objections, the birth certificates will be turned over.
  • If a birth parent refuses to disclose or turn over their information, the adopted child can ask for their birth certificate again after five years, in which state officials will contact birth parents and see if they have changed their minds.

This development isn’t entirely random. Illinois seemed to have drawn its new law from similar laws passed in Maine and New Hampshire, which aim to “balance the rights of adoptive children and parents.” Although some may interpret this law as a free-for-all, it does not leave every birth certificate open for former child adoptees to claim whenever, wherever. Before this new law was signed, former child adoptees could only obtain their birth certificates with a court order.

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Illinois – New law passed for Adoptees to obtain Original Birth Certificate

May24

Quinn Signs Adoption Records Law -   May 21, 2010

 While Mayor Daley has been on a crusade to bring security and safety to Chicago, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has been keeping busy by taking a different path: the Governor on Friday finally signed into law a bill which allows adults who were adopted as children to have easier access to their birth certificates. The main aspects of the new law is, as outlined by the Sun-Times:

  • People seeking birth certificates of adoptions that took place before 1946 can access their information immediately.
  • For those seeking birth certificates after 1946, state officials will spend the next 1.5 years “notifying birth parents and adoptive children that they need to contact the state and declare whether or not they wish to be found … After Nov. 15, 2011, people involved in adoption can request birth certificates, and if the other parties involved have filed no objections, the birth certificates will be turned over.
  • If a birth parent refuses to disclose or turn over their information, the adopted child can ask for their birth certificate again after five years, in which state officials will contact birth parents and see if they have changed their minds.

This development isn’t entirely random. Illinois seemed to have drawn its new law from similar laws passed in Maine and New Hampshire, which aim to “balance the rights of adoptive children and parents.” Although some may interpret this law as a free-for-all, it does not leave every birth certificate open for former child adoptees to claim whenever, wherever. Before this new law was signed, former child adoptees could only obtain their birth certificates with a court order.

 

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Reunion is over – what happens now

November4

Your reunion is over,  do you want to continue contact?

What do you vision of your reunion?

November3

 If you are searching – what would you like to happen in your reunion?

Opening Records

November3

Do you think records ought to be open to all parties?  Adoptee, Adopted Family and Birth Family?

posted under Open Records | 1 Comment »

Birth Parents – do they have and obligation to provide updated medical

November3

If the agency becomes aware that an illness that could effect the adoptees life from the birth family, do they have an obligation to notify the adopted family/adoptee?

posted under Medical | 1 Comment »

Adoptee not being able to get updated medical

November3

Do you believe adoptees have a right to get their updated medical?  How has this effected your life?

Information regarding adoption agencies

November3

If you have information regarding an agency that is operating or has closed in S.C.

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